Monday, 27 August 2018

South Africa, an otherwise failed state, kept together by the capitalism of anarchy

The rule of law is severely damaged when the state does not hold itself to its contract with its citizens. Over recent decades, law has slipped to the extent that South Africa now has several violent riots daily, most of which never make the media.

The lawlessness across the country has been accelerated since the new presidency took over, with government announcing plans to change the covenant it has with the people to get rid of one of the three key stone human rights, the right to property.

Firefighters now need to wear protective gear, and fire stations, like libraries and schools, risk being burnt down.

With crime rates similar to war zones, and widespread unrest, South Africa, unlike upmarket areas, has many of the characteristics of a failed state, this can be traced back to a lack of respect by the government for the rule of law, tracing back to the end of the presidency of Thabo Mbeki.

So, why are there areas of the country which are not so deeply hurt by the gradual collapse of the state? A good portion of arrests in for instance Northcliff, are not effected by police but by private security. In true anarchocapitalist nature, private security companies have effectively replaced the police in areas that can afford them, providing patrols, armed response, and arresting suspects.

Likewise, private investigators and lawyers often get involved in the investigation and reporting of crimes, to counter a lack of capacity in the police, and community policing forums also play a massive role in keeping calm on the surface of the upmarket parts of the country.

The further the state has collapsed, the more the private sector has in some areas picked up the slack, for now.

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Marc Evan Aupiais

Marc Evan Aupiais

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